Electric Production

Source of Electric Power

Outside Energy Suppliers:

Local Energy Suppliers:

  • Sikeston 34.5%
  • MISO market 10.6%
  • Iatan II 15.2%
  • Prairie State 22.9%
  • Crystal Lake wind 2.04%
  • Jefferson City landfill gas 1.84%
  • Bluegrass Ridge wind 1.18%
  • Free Power solar 0.04%
  • Solar One & Net Metering 0.01%
  • Columbia Municipal Power Plant (natural gas) produces 4% to 7%
  • Columbia Energy Center (natural gas) generates during periods of peak electric consumption 2.47% 
  • Landfill Gas Plant produces a little more than 1.12%
  • Photovoltaic (solar) produces less than 1%

NOTE: these percentages are rounded

Municipal Power Plant

power plant
turbine

The Columbia Municipal Power Plant (MPP) is located at 1501 Business Loop 70 East.  The plant has been generating electricity for Columbia since 1914.  Coal was used as the main source of fuel until September 2015, when coal combustion ceased due to new federal Coal Combustion Residuals rules (coal combustion residue regulations ).  From 2008 until 2015, the MPP co-fired wood with coal as part of Columbia’s renewable energy portfolio.  Two natural gas fired units are still in operation at the MPP:  a 35 MW steam turbine generator and a 12.5 MW combustion turbine.  The Electric Utility is working on a project to possibly convert one of the solid fuel fired units to combust biomass as part of Columbia’s renewable energy portfolio.  

Columbia Energy Center

Energy Center

The Columbia Energy Center, located 4902 Peabody Road in northeast Columbia, was constructed by Ameren in 2001 purchased by Columbia Water & Light in June 2011.  Consisting of four General Electric Frame 6B natural gas fired turbines, the plant has a total electrical generating capacity of 144 MW.   The plant is used during times of peak load.

Biogas Energy Plant

Landfill Gas Plant
Engine

The Biogas Energy Plant is located at the City of Columbia Landfill.  Methane gas is produced in the landfill from the decomposition of municipal solid waste.  The gas is collected and delivered to the plant via a pipeline system.  Three General Electric Jenbacher reciprocating engines convert the landfill gas into electricity.  Each engine has a capacity of 1 MW, giving the plant a total capacity of 3 MW.   The electrical output is part of Columbia’s renewable energy portfolio, and in Calendar Year 2016, the plant produced about 1.2% of Columbia’s electrical load.   One additional engine is scheduled to be installed in 2018, which will bring the plant’s capacity to 4 MW.