• collage of employees driving trucks.
  • A photo of a city of Columbia snow plow and captioning for ad purposes
  • Snow plow truck

Updates/Alerts

April 24, 2017 – APWA recognizes Public Works for snow and ice control policies and operations. Press Release.

City employees receiving plaque.


 

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Snow events with 2 inches (or more) of snow 

NO PARKING

Whenever snow accumulates more than 2 inches on the roadway, any vehicle parked on a designated snow route must be moved off of the roadway immediately per City Ordinance14-304. By removing vehicles from priority snow routes, plows are able to quickly and efficiently make priority roads passable by a front-wheel drive vehicle. The fine for failing to move a vehicle from a priority snow route is $100 plus towing and storage charges.

Snow Route No Parking Sign

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snow-accumulation-less-than-4Snow events with less than 4 inches of snow
City crews will focus on plowing and treating 1st and 2nd priority streets for public safety and main routes for school and business. Once 1st and 2nd priority streets are completed, crews begin plowing and treating residential streets Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.


snow-accumulation-greater-than-4

Snow events with more than 4 inches of snow
City crews will focus on plowing and treating 1st and 2nd priority streets for public safety and main routes for school and business, working overtime as necessary. Once 1st and 2nd priority streets are completed, crews begin plowing and treating residential streets to a passable condition, using overtime as necessary.


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Passable by a Front-Wheel Drive Vehicle
A passable road is defined as a street with at least one lane that is traversible for a front wheel drive vehicle at speeds below the normal posted speed limit.  (Warning: Driving skills and vehicle condition may affect your ability to navigate roads defined as passable.)


962-iccube-pkIce Storms
In mid-Missouri, no ice event is exactly the same. Many factors come into play, including air and pavement temperature, precipitation type(s), duration of the event and the forecast to name a few. Operational decisions must often be made quickly and conditions can change rapidly. Generally speaking, an ice event is considered by policy as a winter event of less than 4 inches of snow. That means, crews will concentrate on 1st and 2nd priority routes exclusively as it requires multiple treatments to fight off an active freezing rain/drizzle/fog event.  An operational decision will be made regarding if and when crews treat residential streets (Crews may be called back to priority routes at any time without notice according to changing road and weather conditions).


 untitled-9Columbia Public Works Address